mickey_84

aaronheckmann:

In this post we’ll talk about getting started with Mongoose, an object modeling tool for Mongodb and Nodejs.

Install

We’re going to assume that you have both MongoDB and npm installed for this post. Once we those let’s install Mongoose:

$ npm install mongoose

ashortinspiration:

Ashford & Ashford’s

Ashford & Ashford’s mark holds great symbolic importance to the company as a whole. Two main ideas founded the mark. The first: to create a very structured mark to convey stability, credibility, and legality. The second idea was to use an underlying organic feeling in order to communicate reliability, approachability, and accessibility.

This balance was struck in both the typography and the crest itself. The typeface is structured yet curvilinear. When creating the crest of the mark, we did so in layers. The first layer, the outlining of the crest, is designed to mirror the organic curvature within the typeface. Next was the incorporation of the signature ‘A.’ The ‘A’ is used as a reference to an oil-rig, in relation to the work of Ashford & Ashford. Finally, three curvilinear lines were integrated behind the ‘A’, used to symbolize the layers of the earth. The placing of the diamond in the lower half of the crest was chosen as a reference to minerals.

More on: ghostokc.com

doloresdepalabra:

Los Angeles native Jeff Nishinaka is the world’s premier paper sculptor with a prolific career that spans 30 years. Nishinaka attended UCLA and graduated from the prestigious Art Center College of Design, where he first experimented with paper art and sculpture. Nishinaka’s commercial portfolio includes Bloomingdale’s, Galeries Lafayette, Le Bon Marché, Credit Suisse, Polo Ralph Lauren, Pfizer, Sprint, The Peninsula Hotel, Visa, Penn State University, Paramount Pictures and Coca Cola, among others. Actor Jackie Chan, who is a close friend of the artist, owns the largest collection of Nishinaka’s work. Nishinaka began working in paper quite by accident. “I have always wanted to be a painter, but while studying illustration at Art Center, I was given assignments in both a graphic design and fashion drawing class at the same time to experiment in different mediums, one of them being paper. That was my ‘Ah-ha!’ moment. I quickly developed a feel for working with paper. From then on, I began experimenting with different papers, finding ways to shape, bend, and round edges on it. I wanted to manipulate paper in the least invasive way, to keep the integrity and feel of it. Paper to me is a living, breathing thing that has a life of it’s own. I just try to redirect that energy into something that feels animated and alive.

10gen:

Though CIOs like to talk about the “top talent” they have working for them, too often they’re unable to recruit or retain the best people, as Stefan Dietrich notes on CITO Research. Recruiting the best people isn’t a matter of paying the highest salaries, as Dietrich argues, but rather a matter…

dogzmania4ever:

Reasons to ‘unfriend’ your spouse on Facebook
I don’t know what to think anymore :/

dogzmania4ever:

Reasons to ‘unfriend’ your spouse on Facebook

I don’t know what to think anymore :/

10gen:

Perhaps your business has settled on the exact right operating model, one that will remain static for years, if not decades. But for the 99.999 percent of the rest of the world’s enterprises, your market is in a constant state of flux, demanding constant iterations on how you do business. As the…

showslow:

Small Apartment Walls Covered In 25,000 Ping Pong Balls

With only 90 square feet of living space, this Brooklyn based artist has turned his small living quarters into an artistic apartment. Doing something a bit unorthodox, the man covered all of the walls within his apartment in ping pong balls.

Utilizing over 25,000 grey and white ping pong balls, the walls have been transformed into an almost pixelated screen covering the entire living space. The decor set the man back about $100 per square feet, and took almost 2 weeks to complete.

Something from my country… Attiéké thon

Something from my country… Attiéké thon

showslow:

ruineshumaines - Rotten Days by Tim Etchells.

2006. Performative installation. A collaboration with Vlatka Horvat.

A member of the museum staff writes a new wall text, sign or slogan daily over the course of a month, painting and repainting the same spot with a different cryptic, negative or provocative message. Originally created for the project Nothing Good House - part of Protections exhibition at Kunsthaus Graz.

Beware of your own demons